7 steps to a highly effective workplace safety culture

Safety is a major concern, particularly in the food industry sector. A safe workplace encourages staff to go to work, which is a boon and a valid argument for employers competing in an increasingly tight labor market. Training helps provide a centralized platform that anyone can participate in.

Safety is a major concern, particularly in the food industry sector. A safe workplace encourages staff to go to work, which is a boon and a valid argument for employers competing in an increasingly tight labor market. But how to involve the whole company?

Training helps provide a centralized platform that anyone can participate in. As you build your employee safety training program, here are seven steps that will help you be more successful.

Step 1: be proactive

As you begin building your occupational safety culture, prepare your employees for success by being proactive from day one, starting with employee orientation. This is one of the best opportunities to show how team members are an integral part of the overall strategy, training them on the fundamentals of occupational safety. Make sure they are familiar with the training and understand how it will help them work in a safe environment. Involve team members during the training by asking questions and encouraging discussion about the security issues they feel are important.

Step 2: Start with the end goal in mind

When determining the safety culture in your workplace, try to examine it from the perspective of multiple recipients, your management and your employees.

Both sides should share the ultimate goal of improving safety. But each party will likely have a different view of what the end result should look like and how they will benefit from it. So it’s best to start with the end goal in mind from each party’s point of view.

Start by completing the sentence: “Our safety culture will contribute to …” And then consider how expectations can differ between the company and the employees. From a business perspective, one might expect: “Our safety culture will contribute to…”: train and retain employees; create a safe working environment; produce high quality products; optimize productivity; ensure compliance.

From an employee’s point of view, a culture of safety will help them: carry out their work safely, work in a safe environment, demonstrate that the employer cares about their safety, return safely to their families at the end of the day .

Step 3: Prioritize the essentials

By prioritizing employee safety, you are committed to reacting quickly when an accident occurs. Security officers should investigate the incident immediately by talking to employees, watching videos if available, and reporting the same day if possible.

Companies can show their employees that they are engaged, dedicated, and caring by immediately reviewing what happened and looking for ways to prevent it from happening again.

Step 4: Think of the benefit to all

We all like to be successful, especially when it comes to protecting employees. That’s why it’s important to think about what you expect from your employees and what they expect from you.

Know your employees and their weaknesses. Then show how your workplace safety culture responds to their day-to-day concerns. When you solve a problem, do it in public to show the rest of the company that you really care about your employees.

Employees need to know that you care about them. What benefits them by making their work safer and gaining their trust in the process is ultimately a win for the company.

Step 5: Seek to understand first, then to be understood

It is common for leaders to think that they have all the answers and that employee input is not needed. These leaders are missing out on valuable information. Frontline workers have the best ideas when it comes to workplace safety because they experience it every day. Before deciding on security policies, consult your employees and ask for their input. Think of your employees as internal consultants.

Step 6: Converge your successes

After completing all of the above steps, take some time to share your successes with the entire organization. Publicly celebrate your victories, highlight the support you have received from management and providing the right tools your employees need. Finally, share progress against your shared goals.

Step 7: Hone your tools and create a continuous learning environment

Even if you achieve your goals together, always try to do better. Maintain awareness of safety practices in your environment by holding regular safety meetings. It is not always necessary to schedule these meetings. Some of the best information comes from frequent, spontaneous, and informal conversations with employees.

Try to observe team members often to make sure you understand the work being done. Finally, always keep training front and center with strategically placed posters and digital signage.

Further information: HERE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *